CheatSheet: instant access keyboard shortcut reference for Mac OSX

CheatSheet, a tiny, free app for Mac OSX from Media Atelier (aka Stefan Fürst), has one very simple, but useful, function – by holding down the cmd key just a touch longer than usual it will pop up a convenient overlay showing all of the active keyboard shortcuts in the current app. You can use this as a reference to help you memorise the key presses, print the sheet or, by clicking the label next to a shortcut, use it as a quick alternative to hunting for the option you need in the menu. CheatSheet builds the shortcut list by examining the active menu items of the current app so it’s always up-to-date and doesn’t require any further installs or downloads.

This isn’t the first app to offer this functionality – KeyCue works in much the same way and is a more mature and feature-rich version of the same thing though when I tried it out I didn’t really find any use for the extra functionality it provides. It’s also a lot uglier than CheatSheet and, at €19,99, seriously overpriced for a utility app. However, if you’re still delaying your inevitable upgrade to OSX Lion then KeyCue may be your only option – CheatSheet is Lion (or later) only.

I’d like to see the ability to assign any hot key to CheatSheet as I’d rather utilise one of my unused function keys and, at 3 seconds, the delay in popping up the sheet sometimes seems just a little too long. Those niggles aside, this is a great free app.

 

CheatSheet in action – displaying the hotkeys for Google Chrome

 

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Flashcards for Google Chrome Shortcuts now available from Github.com

The set of flashcards I created for Google Chrome Keyboard Shortcuts on the Mac are now available to download from GitHub. Four versions of the cards are available – tilde-delimited, tab-delimited, Excel spreadsheet and Mental Case study exchange. These should allow you to import the cards into almost any Flashcard application.

In addition, I have also uploaded the cards to two more websites – FlashcardMachine.com and the excellent StudyBlue.com. This means that they are now available, free of charge, from:

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Flashcards for Byword Keyboard Shortcuts now available from GitHub

The set of flashcards I created for Byword Keyboard Shortcuts on the Mac are now available to download from GitHub. Four versions of the cards are available – tilde-delimited, tab-delimited, Excel spreadsheet and Mental Case study exchange. These should allow you to import the cards into almost any Flashcard application.

 

 

In addition, I have also uploaded the cards to two more websites – FlashcardMachine.com and the excellent StudyBlue.com. This means that they are now available, free of charge, from:

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Flashcards for Byword Keyboard Shortcuts

Whenever I have to write a substantial amount of text — more than a few hundred words — then Markdown is my format of choice and Byword on Mac OSX my editor of choice. With its beautifully uncluttered, full-screen interface it makes writing both pleasurable and more productive.

But… if you really want to get the best out of Byword then a good knowledge of the keyboard shortcuts is essential. The last thing you want is to have to pause in full flow and take your hand off the keyboard to reach for the mouse or trackpad to indent a paragraph.

A new set of flashcards I have created and uploaded to Quizlet and Flashcard Exchange contains 60 of the most useful Byword shortcuts. As always, you can use them online or download them, free of charge, into your favourite flashcard app.

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Flashcards for Google Chrome Keyboard Shortcuts

Despite the many advances in learning techniques we’ve seen over the last decade sometimes all that’s required is repetition and lots of it. It’s then that the use of Flashcards comes into its own.

If you tried your luck with the Smarterer.com test I posted about yesterday and found your knowledge wanting then a new set of Flashcards I have created to help you prepare for the test might prove useful. These 40 questions and answer cards match the content and wording of the questions presented in the test.

You can use the cards online or download them for free into your favourite desktop or smartphone app (I use Mental Case on both Mac and iPhone). Then, all that you need is practice, practice, practice.

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